This mews house built in c.1880 to service a large property in Cadogan Square was originally much smaller.  Space was at a premium and every inch was needed on the ground floor for the coach house, stalls and loose box, harness room, grain bins and WC, as well as the stairs to the upper quarters of the coachman and his family and the groom.  The Irish fantasy writer Lord Dunsany accommodated his cars and chauffeur here from 1922 until the Second World War.  In spite of the dangers at their Irish castle during the troubles - which included having a finger shot off at a road-block during the Easter Rising - the chauffeur worked for the Dunsanys at their various homes for over forty years.  The house was later used as garages by anthropologist Captain George Pitt-Rivers, and as an office for the managers of the Great Britain men's hockey team - winners of Olympic gold at Seoul in 1988.

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This terrace was built in c.1859 on the old glebe lands owned by the vicars of St. Mary Abbots since 1260.  The first tenant of the house was Henry O'Neil, one of the most celebrated historical genre painters of the day, whose painting Eastward Ho! had recently drawn huge crowds at the Royal Academy.  A later resident was sculptress Emily Addis Fawcett.  Lyricist Peter Mulroney lived here from 1938.  He took in a young refugee from Nazi Austria - Edward Kassner - and together they set up Mayfair Music.  Kassner went on to establish The Edward Kassner Music Company and published a string of hits, such as Rock Around the Clock which became a global sensation.

Neighbours included writers and artists, such as Max Beerbohm and Wyndham Lewis, and intrepid foreign correspondent Murray Sayle.

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This riverside house built in 1759 was part of a small terrace originally known as Bowling Green Row.  An early resident was a coal merchant who leased the bustling wharf opposite where barges unloaded their cargoes of coal and ice.

The river, which swept in a broad bend across the lane from the terrace and the unique light which emanated from it, later attracted painters such as Joseph Turner, James McNeill Whistler and Philip Wilson Steer to neighbouring houses.  For nearly forty years John Tweed - 'sculptor of the Empire' - lived in this house, where he regularly entertained his closest friend Auguste Rodin.  A later resident was Richard Scott, chairman of The Guardian.

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This house was built c.1829 in the newly fashionable district of Tyburnia.  Several interesting 19th century residents were followed in the 1930s by Lord Killanin, who became President of the International Olympic Committee; and subsequently by two well-known amateur golfers.  In 1959 it was bought by Shirley Bassey - a house of her own for the first time - who installed deep-pile red carpeting, a pale pink sunken bath and a doorbell that chimed her hit song As I Love You.  The Philips recording studio nearby later rented the house for some of their artists, including the blues singer Jon Hendricks.  Lady Mary-Gaye Curzon who had been one of the most glamorous debutantes of her day was a resident in the 1970s.  

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This house was built in 1933-4 as part of the complete redevelopment of the area into a fashionable district.  It was designed with all the modern conveniences expected in the 1930s, such as an ensuite bathroom to the principal bedroom, a rubbish hatch in the kitchen and a serving hatch through to the dining room.  The top floor landing featured a housemaid's cupboard fitted with an enamel sink.  In 1948 it was the first marital home of the Hon. Wentworth Beaumont, a heroic Spitfire pilot who had been imprisoned in Stalag Luft III, the setting for what was to be immortalised in the cinema as The Great Escape.  As ADC to Lord Mountbatten in India in 1947, Beaumont and his fiancee Sarah (the daughter of General Lord Ismay) experienced a horrific journey to Delhi, where the Muslim passengers were pulled out of the train by their Hindu fellow travellers and butchered in the most brutal manner.  Their servant, hidden under the seat, was the only Muslim to arrive at Delhi.

Neighbours have varied from dapper American publisher Morley Kennerley, poet and diplomat George Seferis, comedian Jack Train and 'Spycatcher' Lieutenant-Colonel Oreste Pinto - to the getaway driver for the Great Train Robbery in 1963.

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The Shaftesbury Park Estate was the most publicised and widely discussed housing experiment of its day.  Built between 1872 and 1877, it was the first major development of the Artizans, Labourers and General Dwellings Company, founded by a band of working men and supported by philanthropist Lord Shaftesbury.  The aim of the new estate, promoted as the 'Workmen's City', was not only to create healthy and affordable housing, but also a community spirit by the provision of meeting rooms, schools and open space - but no pubs.

This house, originally a two-up-two-down cottage, soon became a newsagent and tobacconist.  A shopfront was installed and the workshop behind was fitted up as a barber's shop - a common pairing at the time.

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A house built in 1821 and forming part of a terrace flanking Union Chapel.  From the mid-19th century the chapel was famous for its music and the congregation thought nothing of tackling the Hallelujah Chorus.  Fittingly a music master was the first owner and resident of this house.  After his death it was let by his family to a wide variety of people, including a German ship owner, and a retired lamp manufacturer who took a prominent - and corrupt - role in parish affairs and had a local road named after him.  Another colourful occupant, a keen gambler and racehorse owner, had a chain of tobacconists and oyster bars - the fast food of the day.  More recent residents were the actress Sally Miles and director Gavin Millar.

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This house was built in c.1846 on the Ladbroke Estate.  Its first residents were a barrister, and later an army major who was charged with assault for defending the honour of his actress wife with a horsewhip.  In 1890 it was the home of German mathematician Olaus Henrici.  Residents in the 20th century included a wholesale leather dealer - a refugee from the Russian pogroms - and subsequently another refugee Jewish family from Vienna.  Neighbours were suffragette Emmeline Pankhurst who lived a few doors away with her adopted 'war babies'; prison reformer Margery Fry; and Danish soprano Engel Lund and her stage partner Ferdinand Rauter.

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The Barley Mow in Dorset Street was built in c.1791 and is now the oldest surviving pub in Marylebone.  The interior retains its original matchboard panelling and, most notably, a pair of late 19th century panelled drinking boxes.  Private booths were once commonplace but are now an exceptionally rare survival.  They were compared at the time to the similar arrangement in pawnbrokers' shops, which was perhaps their inspiration.

In the first part of its history the Barley Mow was the centre of the local community, providing the venue for public meetings and inquests, illegal gambling and sweepstakes.  Its clientele has ranged over the years from guardsmen at the Life Guards stables in the 18th century, to a hardcore of swigging admakers from the nearby agencies in the 20th.  No doubt the pub was the cause of much annoyance in the 19th century to Charles Babbage, the 'father of computing' who lived and worked a few doors away and loathed street music and noise.

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This magnificent stucco-faced house, designed by George Basevi and built in 1833 on the site of nursery gardens, was at first considered almost in the country.  The crescent was soon home to some eminent residents, including the French Prime Minister, Francois Guizot, who was forced to flee with his family by the revolution of 1848.  Another neighbour was Edward John Trelawny, the writer, adventurer and companion of Byron and Shelley.

In the 20th century popular actress Lilian Braithwaite lived next door with her daughter Joyce Carey.  Other residents included actor-manager Nigel Playfair; dramatist Emlyn Williams; Margot Fonteyn; author Eric Ambler; and publisher Max Reinhardt.

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