A house built c.1826 and home for many years to a wax chandler before it became a lodging house. Later residents included a wealthy tailor in the 1920s who fatally took poison mistaking it for mouthwash; and Sir John Arnold, a senior divorce and family judge.

In the 1890s Rosa Lewis ran a maison de convenience at a nearby house, where the Prince of Wales and his friends could take their mistresses.  Other neighbours were Lord Snowdon, who was born in the street; Whitehall mandarin and novelist C.P. Snow; the actor Christopher Lee; Sir John Rennie, head of MI6; and Sir Terence Conran.

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This was rebuilt in 1927 on the site of an early 19th century house developed in the grounds of the curiously named Tart Hall, a Jacobean mansion belonging to Lord Stafford.  The first residents of the street followed a great range of crafts, trades and labouring occupations.  By about 1920 the area had become more fashionable - neighbours included the cookery writer Elizabeth David, who spent her childhood here; and Lady Idina Sackville, later a prominent member of the Happy Valley set in Kenya. Other residents included George Pitt-Rivers, a wealthy anthropologist and Eugenics expert, who was imprisoned in the Tower of London during WW2 as a Mosleyite Nazi sympathiser.  Randolph Churchill lived directly opposite.

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Many of the early residents of this house built in 1884 were distinguished army officers.  General Sir Percy Radcliffe lived here in the 1920s and in the 1940s Major-General Gordon Grimsdale, who was head of the British Military Mission to China during World War II.  Later residents included George Sinclair-Stevenson, the doyen of the lawyers of Hong Kong, and the mezzo-soprano star Regina Sarfaty.

The Victorian historical painter Mrs. Henrietta Ward lived next door and gave art lessons to many of the royal children in a studio she converted from stables.  From 1930 to 1956 Noel Coward lived at this studio which he extensively remodelled.  His parties there often entailed a throng including Joan Crawford, Douglas Fairbanks Jnr, John Gielgud and Laurence Olivier.

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A semi-detached house built in c.1853 in an Italianate style.  The new district soon attracted wealthy professional people, as well as artists and writers including the poet Robert Browning and John Tenniel, the illustrator of Alice in Wonderland.  In the late 1870s the painter Edward Robert Hughes lived at the house.  As well as being an accomplished artist himself, Hughes was also studio assistant to the Pre-Raphaelite William Holman Hunt, who suffered from glaucoma in old age.  He assisted him with the paintings The Light of the World and The Lady of Shalott.  A much later resident was India Jane Birley.

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This semi-detached villa was built in c.1837 on the site of nursery gardens.  It was first home to a clerk at the Bank of England, and later a merchant trading with Japan and China.  When it was first built the house looked out over fields towards the Royal Caledonian Asylum, for the orphans of soldiers and sailors, and the new 'model' Pentonville prison.  Nearby was the extensive Laycock's Dairy which supplied London with milk until the 1860s.  The covered cattle lairs were used for keeping animals overnight on their way to Smithfield market.

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A house built in 1847 on the Moore family's estate in Chelsea.  The first tenants were tradesmen and shared the house with others.  The street smartened up considerably from the 1950s - the first time that this house even had a bathroom - with neighbours such as Robin Denison-Pender who helped revitalise the fortunes of the Albert Hall in the 1970s.  The MP Sir Brandon Rhys Williams lived next door for many years.  In the early 1960s the artist John Doyle lived in this house and from the 1970s Countess Cawdor and her family.

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The first house on this site was built in c.1698 and was replaced by two houses in 1770.  Due to severe structural defects these were in turn demolished and rebuilt in 1963 in the Georgian style. Residents have ranged from an early 18th century chancellor of the exchequer to the Reverend Dr. Dodd, known as the 'Macaroni Parson' owing to his extravagant taste in clothes.  After forging a bond for £4,200 the Reverend Dodd was hanged at Tyburn in 1775 - curiously the butler was hanged there almost exactly a year later for burgling the house.  A later resident, Sir Richard Worsley, was ambassador to Venice from 1793 until its annexation in 1797.  He managed to escape Venice when it was invaded, travelling home on a Royal Navy ship to protect the priceless antiquities he had bought in Italy.

The house and its immediate neighbour became the Irish Office from 1806 until 1922 when British rule ended over much of Ireland.

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This early Georgian House became the home of a master cabinet maker from 1875.  The workshop he founded continued here and in a shop behind for over sixty years.  Lodgers during this period included architect Thomas Bridson and Sir Geoffrey Langdon Keynes, the distinguished surgeon and bibliophile.

Air Commodore Constantine Benson, a director of the City banking house Robert Benson, Lonsdale & Co., lived here for many years from the late 1930s.  Neighbours in the street included the actor John Gielgud, Lord Reith of the BBC and numerous MPs.

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A house built in c.1720 which retains its original panelling and other features from this period.  It was used as a small boarding school in the mid-19th century and later a lodging house.  The writer and journalist Edmund Moyle boarded here for many years from 1917.  Until well into the 20th century a busy forge and workshop operated behind the house, with the grooms and others associated with it living in the cottages next door.

Norman Collins lived here in the 1930s - he was a writer, and later a radio and television executive who became one of the major figures behind the establishment of the ITV network.

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Laid out on the old kitchen gardens of Beaufort House, this Chelsea square was one of the first to be built after the opening of the Kings Road.  The house was  built c.1840 and its first resident a retired naval officer.  The area declined in prosperity towards the end of the century and many of the properties became lodging houses, including this one for a short time.  The Victorian artist s became lodging houses,u- endhouseyxWcan Cicdingp>

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