A house built in 1847 on the Moore family's estate in Chelsea.  The first tenants were tradesmen and shared the house with others.  The street smartened up considerably from the 1950s - the first time that this house even had a bathroom - with neighbours such as Robin Denison-Pender who helped revitalise the fortunes of the Albert Hall in the 1970s.  The MP Sir Brandon Rhys Williams lived next door for many years.  In the early 1960s the artist John Doyle lived in this house and from the 1970s Countess Cawdor and her family.

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The first house on this site was built in c.1698 and was replaced by two houses in 1770.  Due to severe structural defects these were in turn demolished and rebuilt in 1963 in the Georgian style. Residents have ranged from an early 18th century chancellor of the exchequer to the Reverend Dr. Dodd, known as the 'Macaroni Parson' owing to his extravagant taste in clothes.  After forging a bond for £4,200 the Reverend Dodd was hanged at Tyburn in 1775 - curiously the butler was hanged there almost exactly a year later for burgling the house.  A later resident, Sir Richard Worsley, was ambassador to Venice from 1793 until its annexation in 1797.  He managed to escape Venice when it was invaded, travelling home on a Royal Navy ship to protect the priceless antiquities he had bought in Italy.

The house and its immediate neighbour became the Irish Office from 1806 until 1922 when British rule ended over much of Ireland.

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This early Georgian House became the home of a master cabinet maker from 1875.  The workshop he founded continued here and in a shop behind for over sixty years.  Lodgers during this period included architect Thomas Bridson and Sir Geoffrey Langdon Keynes, the distinguished surgeon and bibliophile.

Air Commodore Constantine Benson, a director of the City banking house Robert Benson, Lonsdale & Co., lived here for many years from the late 1930s.  Neighbours in the street included the actor John Gielgud, Lord Reith of the BBC and numerous MPs.

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A house built in c.1720 which retains its original panelling and other features from this period.  It was used as a small boarding school in the mid-19th century and later a lodging house.  The writer and journalist Edmund Moyle boarded here for many years from 1917.  Until well into the 20th century a busy forge and workshop operated behind the house, with the grooms and others associated with it living in the cottages next door.

Norman Collins lived here in the 1930s - he was a writer, and later a radio and television executive who became one of the major figures behind the establishment of the ITV network.

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Laid out on the old kitchen gardens of Beaufort House, this Chelsea square was one of the first to be built after the opening of the Kings Road.  The house was  built c.1840 and its first resident a retired naval officer.  The area declined in prosperity towards the end of the century and many of the properties became lodging houses, including this one for a short time.  The Victorian artist Walter Burgess, who chronicled much of old Chelsea, lived nearby and directly next door the painter Paul Nash.  Other notable people in the square included Samuel Beckett, author of Waiting for Godot; novelist Jean Rhys; Sir Lawrence Gowing; scientist Patrick Blackett; and naturalist and author Gavin Maxwell.  

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This street was greatly disrupted by the arrival of the Metropolitan and District Railway in 1864, leading to the compulsory purchase and demolition of eight of its newly-built houses.  The banker who was the first resident of this house moved away to avoid the disruption and the street was considered to have suffered a fall in quality.  Many others however were not put off, such as the Shakespearean actor Henry Compton who lived in the street for many years and librettist Sir William Gilbert whose first marital home was nearby.

Later residents of the street included Sir Samuel Wilson who served as Governor of Trinidad and Tobago in the 1920s and who did much to popularise the game of football, and the actors Perceval Perceval-Clark and Jean Cadell.

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A house built in 1851 on the site of the old Kensington workhouse.  The Great Exhibition that year made the area highly fashionable and this cul-de-sac was soon home to professional or independent people able to afford the high rents.  Distinguished artists, such as Richard Westmacott the Younger and Jasper Cropsey, also lived in the street and General Garibaldi breakfasted at a neighbouring house on his visit to London in 1864.  Later residents included civil engineer Sir Benjamin Baker who designed the Forth Bridge, and Admiral Sir Francis McClintock known for his discoveries in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

An early resident of this house was the Reverend Teignmouth-Shore, Chaplain-in-Ordinary to Queen Victoria and later to Edward VII and George V.  He was present at all the royal events and was held in such high regard by Queen Victoria's daughter, the Empress of Germany, that her son the Kaiser telegraphed Teignmouth-Shore to be present at her deathbed in 1901.  The actress Ambrosine Phillpotts, whose films included Room at the Top and Expresso Bongo, moved here after the Second World War.

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'Kensington New Town', built on old nursery ground from 1839, was home to many distinguished artists.  The engraver and watercolourist Joseph Lionel Williams, and subsequently his widow, lived in this house for nearly fifty years.  Across the road at Eldon Lodge lived Edward Henry Corbould, historical painter and Instructor of Drawing and Painting to Queen Victoria's children.  Numerous other artists in the street included animal painter Richard Ansdell, portrait painter Samuel Sidley, Richard Caton Woodville and John Hanson Walker - a protege of Lord Leighton.

This hive of artistic activity continued well into the twentieth century.  Other interesting residents of the street have included David Lloyd George, Sir Hugh Casson and Dustin Hoffman - and at this house Lord Hambro.

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The great spurt of building on the Ladbroke estate in the early 1850s far outstripped demand, bankrupting many of the developers in the process.  In parts of the estate carcases of unfinished houses with crumbling decorations stood unoccupied for years - in fact the neighbouring street to this house was known as 'Coffin Row'.

The grand architecture of this crescent represents the full-on confident splendour of the Victorian age.  Its position was advertised as 'one of the most healthy and desirable' in West London - however noxious gases from the new sewers probably caused the death of the three-year-old son of the first resident of this house.  A prosperous military tailor lived here for many years, later acquiring the freehold of the house next door as well.  The two houses were partly combined to create an imposing double frontage.

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A house built c.1846 and home to an array of distinguished residents.  One of these was the third Baron Aberdare - an army officer, and champion amateur tennis player and cricketer.  During the 1930s and 40s he served on the International Olympic Committee and was a key player in the decision to send British athletes to Hitler's 1936 Olympics.  Commander Allon Bacon moved here in 1949.  During the war he had been a naval intelligence officer at Bletchley Park, where he held various posts, including liaison with the Admiralty.  He was also involved in daring commando raids on German submarines, during one capturing an Enigma and vital documents - George VI called this 'perhaps the most important single event in the whole war at sea'.

Other residents of the street have included numerous artists, the poet Henry Newbolt, a Russian princess, David Lloyd George, Sir Hugh Casson and Dustin Hoffman.

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