The area known as Fulham Fields was mostly in the occupation of market gardeners and nurserymen until the last quarter of the 19th century, growing corn, vegetables and fruit for the Covent Garden market.  The stimulus for development came from the Metropolitan District Railway and this house was built in 1886-7.  An eminent architect, Francis Fowler, was an early resident who had worked with his father on the design of many of the theatres in Shaftesbury Avenue.  A later occupant of the house was Surveyor General of Ceylon.  Across the road the vicar started a church cricket and football club in 1879 which was later to become the nucleus of Fulham Football Club.  Other residents in the street included the actress and prolific author Florence Marryat, particularly known for her sensational novels and her involvement with several celebrated spiritual mediums.  Formula 1 champion James Hunt lived nearby in the early 1980s.

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This house was first built in 1850 on the site of market gardens.  An early resident was Ernest Jones, one of the most prominent figures of the Chartist movement, who knew both Marx and Engels personally.  In 1886 the house and its neighbour were combined and rebuilt as a coach-house and stables for the brand new Kensington Court development directly behind.  The building had space for two carriages, stabling for eight horses and living quarters for a coachman and grooms. Sophisticated features included a lift for the carriages.  For many years it housed the carriages, then the cars, of Louis Montagu 2nd Baron Swaythling.  After 1929 the house was converted back to private residential use.  Other residents in the street included J.T. Grein, the influential impresario and drama critic, and film producers Lord Birkett and Robert Erskine.  Psychotherapist Stephen Sebag-Montefiore ran his practice from his basement nearby - inspiring a 1965 television sketch by Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, both of whom he treated.

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Nelson thought this terrace built in the 1770s 'one of the finest rows of houses in the environs of the Metropolis'.  The relatively isolated position made highwaymen and footpads a hazard - nonetheless prosperous City merchants and bankers soon moved in, attracted by the high and healthy land and far-reaching views.  A wealthy wine merchant was the first resident of this house in 1775.  Others in the terrace later included politician Joseph Chamberlain and author Wilkie Collins who attended a boarding school in one of the neighbouring houses - he attributed his talent for storytelling to the bullying he experienced there.  At the start of the 20th century the house became the offices of the Great Northern & City Railway Co., the only tube to have had first-class seating.  From the 1920s for 75 years it was an Italian restaurant - later a cafe - at one time frequented by Walter Sickert who ran a school of painting two doors down.  The basement of a nearby house in the terrace was used as a recording studio by musician Curly Clayton where he recorded the first session with the Rolling Stones in 1962.

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Belgravia was one of London's most fashionable residential districts from the start and until the Second World War remained a securely upper class address.  This house was built c.1844 by Thomas Cubitt and has been home to a son of Lord Penrhyn and a wealthy racehorse owner and breeder.  From 1936 it was owned by the 2nd Lord Pender of Cable and Wireless.  During the war the company, working with the Post Office, introduced Expeditionary Force Messages which became the key communication for soldiers sending messages home and vice versa - these messages sometimes totalling 20,000 a day.  

Other residents of the street have included aviation pioneer John Moore-Brabazon and the Marquis of Queensberry, remembered for the 'Marquis of Queensberry' rules that formed the basis of modern boxing and for his role in the downfall of Oscar Wilde.

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A house built c.1828 and part of Harrow School's development of its land in the area.  The seclusion given by such spacious houses, in easy carriage distance of the West End, quickly gave St. John's Wood a slightly risque reputation with mistresses and courtesans living here.  But seclusion was also a requirement for writers and artists, many of whom began settling in this street and nearby.  These included Sir Edwin Landseer who lived in a large house nearby, his brother Thomas who lived in the street, and Alfred and Lionel Constable who were directly next door.

Emily Davies lived in this house for twenty-five years.  She was a feminist and pioneering campaigner for women's education - her crowning achievement being the foundation of Girton College Cambridge.

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Forest Hill became a fashionable suburb in the 19th century - the catalysts for its prosperity being the removal of the Crystal Palace to Sydenham and the arrival of the railway.  The geography of the area, with its picturesque hills and valleys and fine views also encouraged wealthy people, such as tea merchants Frederick Horniman and the Tetley brothers to live here.  This house was built c.1883 and has been home to a variety of residents, including a Spanish cork manufacturer and John Illsley of Dire Straits.  From the 1930s for more than sixty years Ling's confectionery factory abutting on to the garden behind perfumed the air with Turkish Delight.

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Built in c.1862 on the exclusive Phillimore Estate, this house started life as a small boarding school for girls - mainly from naval, military and colonial families.  Two pupils from the early 1870s were daughters of the highly decorated General William Trevor, known as the 'Famous Indian Fighter' and involved in the capture of Rangoon.  After the Second World War the Director of the British Museum, Sir Thomas Downing Kendrick, lived here.  He achieved recognition for Victorian art, generally derided at the time, with assistance from John Betjeman and John Piper - but is now partly remembered for his over-zealous 'cleaning' of museum objects.

Many artists, writers and musicians have lived nearby, including Sir William Gilbert, Linley Sambourne, Kenneth Grahame and Freddie Mercury.

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This house is believed to be on the site of a medieval tavern where pilgrims stayed when they visited the nearby tomb of Edward the Confessor.  The present house was built c.1722 as a pub, which it remained until 1889.  Many interesting people lived here when it was a lodging house in the subsequent years before 1920.  These included American artist Joseph Pennell and his wife, a writer, who regularly entertained at the house their wide circle of artistic and intellectual friends, such as Bernard Shaw, Henry James and Edmund Gosse.  In the 20th century the immediate area became a smart place to live, particularly favoured by politicians for its convenience to the Palace of Westminster.  John Reith, the first Director-General of the BBC, lived in the house in the 1920s - and used his study for Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin's broadcast to the nation during the General Strike of 1926.

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A house built c.1737 and one of Mayfair's oldest surviving houses.  It was originally at the less fashionable end of the street and was occupied by various tradesmen before becoming a lodging house for the last half of the 19th century.  The house was enlarged in 1915 and subsequent residents included a Broadway producer and an American banker involved in the collapse of Farrow's Bank in 1920.  Thousands of people lost every penny they had, amongst them large numbers of clergymen.  In the early 1930s Peter Watson lived here - he became one of the European art market's wealthiest patrons and the man who helped launch the careers of Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud.  He was also a co-founder of the magazine Horizon and the Institute of Contemporary Arts.  He met a squalid end - not in this house - probably murdered in his bath by a male lover who stood to inherit the bulk of his fortune and his extensive art collection.

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This quiet street tucked away behind the commercial buildings of the Strand is still lined with many of its original late 17th century houses and was once home to an astonishing array of famous people. Samuel Pepys lived here when he was Secretary to the Admiralty; and Henry Fielding, Charles Dickens and Samuel Taylor Coleridge all lodged here.  Others ranged from a daughter of Oliver Cromwell to Sir Humphrey Davy who conducted experiments in a basement workshop.  Some of the numerous artists were Charles Calvert, William Etty, Clarkson Stanfield and Arthur Rackham.

Philosopher Jean Jacques Rousseau lodged at this house in 1766.  It was later the office of J.T. Grein, the Dutch impresario who helped establish the modern theatre in London, and the home of numerous actors.  In 1939 it became for 50 years the offices of formidable literary agent A.D. Peters.  Two of his authors - E.M. Delafield and Alec Waugh - were billeted at the house during World War 2 and were to be found on the roofs of the Adelphi equipped with tin hats and stirrup-pumps, acting as air wardens.

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