Early residents of this house built in the mid-1840s included prolific inventor James Boydell and orientalist William Burckhardt Barker, who died supervising a land transport depot on the Black Sea during the Crimean War.  From the early 1960s the terrace and crescent behind became a celebrated nerve-centre for liberal intellectuals, artists, writers and journalists.  These included Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett, A.J. Ayer, Claire Tomalin, Ursula Vaughan Williams and jazz musician George Melly. Terence Conran, Judi Dench, documentary filmmaker Humphrey Jennings and writer V.S. Pritchett have all lived in the terrace, and children's illustrator Aliki Brandenberg in the house for many years.

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This house built c.1878 on former farmland has had many interesting residents, including one of the first women to serve as a County Councillor in the early 20th century.  She was remarkable also for her views on the Suffragettes who she felt had done untold harm to the cause of women in public life.  The first resident was a Baptist minister and another helped develop the railways in China.  After the Second World War the house was converted into flats - many people connected with the arts subsequently lived here, such as theatre director Peter Zadek, violinist and writer Herbert Whone, and military historian and entrepreneur Peter Elstob.

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Before the arrival of the railways, the area was reputedly so quiet that its inhabitants could set their clocks from the striking of Big Ben, and in 1815 they claimed further to have heard the cannon fire at Waterloo.  The house was built c.1888.  It was part of the development of the Flitcroft estate, called after its 18th century owner who was a protege of the Earl of Burlington and the architect of Wentworth Woodhouse in Yorkshire, which at over 600 feet in length, made it the longest house in England.

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Restoration dramatist Thomas Southerne lived in an earlier house on this site from 1704.  Southerne was intimate with many of his literary contemporaries, including Dryden, Swift and Pope, and achieved considerable financial success with plays such as 'The Fatal Marriage'.  A century later the street had declined in prosperity and the house became a butcher's shop.

The present house was built in an imposing late Victorian style in 1888 as part of a general smartening up of the street and conversion of many of the houses to offices.  Adams & Co, manufacturers of bathroom products, were the first tenants, producing iconic Art Deco-inspired designs.  Near neighbours have included a Foreign Secretary in the 1930s, the Beaverbrook Foundation, the Labour Party headquarters, the Spectator and the Embassy of Chile.

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A house built in 1778 and used for 200 years as Lambeth Rectory.  The first rectors were also chaplains to the Archbishop of Canterbury at nearby Lambeth Palace, and included a brother of the poet William Wordsworth and a future Earl of Chichester.  The house was severely damaged in the Second World War and was rebuilt without its original top storey.  In the 1960s Lambeth was a very mixed area - the rector at the time noted that his immediate neighbours on one side were the Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Reith, the head of the BBC, whilst across the road was an estate where lived nine of the Great Train Robbers.

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Two houses built c.1825 in the new fashionable Tyburnia, possibly on the exact site of the old Tyburn gallows.  Residents included the son of General Lawrence, who died defending the Residency at Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny, and later Edmond Carton de Wiart, the Belgian delegate at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919.  After the houses had been converted to flats in the late 1950s, Paul Robeson, the American singer, actor and Civil Rights activist lived here.  In the 1970s a nearby house was the notorious base of Victor Lownes, who managed the London Playboy Club.  He hosted Bacchanalian parties where the guest list included Bill Cosby, Tony Curtis and Warren Beatty.

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The opening of Vauxhall Bridge in 1816 led to the development of 'Holland Town' by the host and politician 3rd Lord Holland, who hoped to revive his shaky fortunes.  This charming semi-detached house was built c.1823 by a horse dealer, turned developer.  At first the neighbours were typically wealthy professional people and a dairyman ran his business from the property next door, keeping cows in the mews behind.  The district suffered a gradual decline in prosperity, mainly owing to the arrival of the railways in the mid-19th century.  By the 1970s the prevailing delapidation in large parts of the road had become chronic and the house became increasingly derelict and vandalised.  

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The development of the triangle between Edgware Road and Bayswater Road into a fashionable district known as Tyburnia began in the early 19th century.  This house built in the late 1820s had some very interesting residents.  One of the first was Richard Belgrave Hoppner, the son of John Hoppner RA, and likewise a painter.  He was also a poet, translator and diplomat, and was appointed English Consul-General at Venice 1814-25.  Hoppner was a close friend of Lord Byron, and he and his wife looked after Byron's illegitimate daughter Allegra for a time.  Byron took little paternal interest in Allegra and the child died aged five of typhus in a convent in Italy.

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West Kensington house history

This house was built in 1883.  The road and surrounding streets are on the site of former brickfields, an area known as the 'Dismal Swamp', owing to its marshes and lying water caused by digging for brick clay.  It was described in 1859 as an 'utter abomination', with refuse from the extensive laundry and bleaching factory as well as sewage from Shepherd's Bush draining into it.  The coming of the railways transformed this district and easy transportation into London, by railway or horse drawn tram, encouraged urban development.

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West Kensington house history

A house built c1882 and part of the Gunter Estate.  The Gunter fortune originated in an 18th century confectionery shop in Berkeley Square, which sold ice-cream with surprisingly 'modern' flavours, such as parmesan, brown bread or pistachio.  One of the residents in this house became Attorney-General in Singapore in 1936 and was interned in a Japanese war camp in Taiwan when Singapore fell in 1942 - he died shortly afterwards of dysentery.  In the general confusion of the war, his family were not told of his death for several months. 

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