This house is believed to be on the site of a medieval tavern where pilgrims stayed when they visited the nearby tomb of Edward the Confessor.  The present house was built c.1722 as a pub, which it remained until 1889.  Many interesting people lived here when it was a lodging house in the subsequent years before 1920.  These included American artist Joseph Pennell and his wife, a writer, who regularly entertained at the house their wide circle of artistic and intellectual friends, such as Bernard Shaw, Henry James and Edmund Gosse.  In the 20th century the immediate area became a smart place to live, particularly favoured by politicians for its convenience to the Palace of Westminster.  John Reith, the first Director-General of the BBC, lived in the house in the 1920s - and used his study for Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin's broadcast to the nation during the General Strike of 1926.

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A house built c.1737 and one of Mayfair's oldest surviving houses.  It was originally at the less fashionable end of the street and was occupied by various tradesmen before becoming a lodging house for the last half of the 19th century.  The house was enlarged in 1915 and subsequent residents included a Broadway producer and an American banker involved in the collapse of Farrow's Bank in 1920.  Thousands of people lost every penny they had, amongst them large numbers of clergymen.  In the early 1930s Peter Watson lived here - he became one of the European art market's wealthiest patrons and the man who helped launch the careers of Francis Bacon and Lucian Freud.  He was also a co-founder of the magazine Horizon and the Institute of Contemporary Arts.  He met a squalid end - not in this house - probably murdered in his bath by a male lover who stood to inherit the bulk of his fortune and his extensive art collection.

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This quiet street tucked away behind the commercial buildings of the Strand is still lined with many of its original late 17th century houses and was once home to an astonishing array of famous people. Samuel Pepys lived here when he was Secretary to the Admiralty; and Henry Fielding, Charles Dickens and Samuel Taylor Coleridge all lodged here.  Others ranged from a daughter of Oliver Cromwell to Sir Humphrey Davy who conducted experiments in a basement workshop.  Some of the numerous artists were Charles Calvert, William Etty, Clarkson Stanfield and Arthur Rackham.

Philosopher Jean Jacques Rousseau lodged at this house in 1766.  It was later the office of J.T. Grein, the Dutch impresario who helped establish the modern theatre in London, and the home of numerous actors.  In 1939 it became for 50 years the offices of formidable literary agent A.D. Peters.  Two of his authors - E.M. Delafield and Alec Waugh - were billeted at the house during World War 2 and were to be found on the roofs of the Adelphi equipped with tin hats and stirrup-pumps, acting as air wardens.

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Early residents of this house built in the mid-1840s included prolific inventor James Boydell and orientalist William Burckhardt Barker, who died supervising a land transport depot on the Black Sea during the Crimean War.  From the early 1960s the terrace and crescent behind became a celebrated nerve-centre for liberal intellectuals, artists, writers and journalists.  These included Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett, A.J. Ayer, Claire Tomalin, Ursula Vaughan Williams and jazz musician George Melly. Terence Conran, Judi Dench, documentary filmmaker Humphrey Jennings and writer V.S. Pritchett have all lived in the terrace, and children's illustrator Aliki Brandenberg in the house for many years.

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This house built c.1878 on former farmland has had many interesting residents, including one of the first women to serve as a County Councillor in the early 20th century.  She was remarkable also for her views on the Suffragettes who she felt had done untold harm to the cause of women in public life.  The first resident was a Baptist minister and another helped develop the railways in China.  After the Second World War the house was converted into flats - many people connected with the arts subsequently lived here, such as theatre director Peter Zadek, violinist and writer Herbert Whone, and military historian and entrepreneur Peter Elstob.

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Before the arrival of the railways, the area was reputedly so quiet that its inhabitants could set their clocks from the striking of Big Ben, and in 1815 they claimed further to have heard the cannon fire at Waterloo.  The house was built c.1888.  It was part of the development of the Flitcroft estate, called after its 18th century owner who was a protege of the Earl of Burlington and the architect of Wentworth Woodhouse in Yorkshire, which at over 600 feet in length, made it the longest house in England.

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Restoration dramatist Thomas Southerne lived in an earlier house on this site from 1704.  Southerne was intimate with many of his literary contemporaries, including Dryden, Swift and Pope, and achieved considerable financial success with plays such as 'The Fatal Marriage'.  A century later the street had declined in prosperity and the house became a butcher's shop.

The present house was built in an imposing late Victorian style in 1888 as part of a general smartening up of the street and conversion of many of the houses to offices.  Adams & Co, manufacturers of bathroom products, were the first tenants, producing iconic Art Deco-inspired designs.  Near neighbours have included a Foreign Secretary in the 1930s, the Beaverbrook Foundation, the Labour Party headquarters, the Spectator and the Embassy of Chile.

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A house built in 1778 and used for 200 years as Lambeth Rectory.  The first rectors were also chaplains to the Archbishop of Canterbury at nearby Lambeth Palace, and included a brother of the poet William Wordsworth and a future Earl of Chichester.  The house was severely damaged in the Second World War and was rebuilt without its original top storey.  In the 1960s Lambeth was a very mixed area - the rector at the time noted that his immediate neighbours on one side were the Archbishop of Canterbury and Lord Reith, the head of the BBC, whilst across the road was an estate where lived nine of the Great Train Robbers.

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Two houses built c.1825 in the new fashionable Tyburnia, possibly on the exact site of the old Tyburn gallows.  Residents included the son of General Lawrence, who died defending the Residency at Lucknow during the Indian Mutiny, and later Edmond Carton de Wiart, the Belgian delegate at the Paris Peace Conference in 1919.  After the houses had been converted to flats in the late 1950s, Paul Robeson, the American singer, actor and Civil Rights activist lived here.  In the 1970s a nearby house was the notorious base of Victor Lownes, who managed the London Playboy Club.  He hosted Bacchanalian parties where the guest list included Bill Cosby, Tony Curtis and Warren Beatty.

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The opening of Vauxhall Bridge in 1816 led to the development of 'Holland Town' by the host and politician 3rd Lord Holland, who hoped to revive his shaky fortunes.  This charming semi-detached house was built c.1823 by a horse dealer, turned developer.  At first the neighbours were typically wealthved iaccNew Road.pni a futdairy whorais bathuger fash the strpean heanext dooturkeep semcoitemhe mid- iteind benbsp;The houdiikinsiteufence futgrad frilined i prosperity ananufinon tw the he devival of the railways, temhe mid-1840 century.  TheBhe hos0s a n strpeevway theegaapiion, temhege numtiesf the Aded was been c of chrc Art the house became a bluddmoger,damaly dnsit thev thsts.eenbsp;The>

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