The first owner of this house, built in 1829, held the prestigious appointment of Harpist to Queen Adelaide.  Subsequent residents included a Lady of the Bedchamber to Queen Victoria; a renowned botanist; Viscount Drumlanrig (later 8th Marquess of Queensberry); Lord Ellenborough; diplomat the Hon. Henry Edwardes; Sir Henry Chamberlain; and Gilbert Edgar, who was chairman of the jewellers H. Samuel.

In 1946 the house was acquired by Lord and Lady Mountbatten.  A frequent guest was Noel Coward, and Prince Philip used it as his London base before his marriage to Princess Elizabeth in November 1947.  BBC footage records him leaving the house for the wedding.

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Built in 1858 on the Phillimore Estate, this house was first occupied by a dentist and cupper (or practitioner of blood-letting).  Subsequent residents included H.M. Chief Inspector of Factories, a landscape painter and the architect Edward I'Anson, who with his father was responsible for many of the commercial buildings in the City of London.  In 1915 the house was taken by the Catholic Church of Our Lady of Victories for their presbytery, and was occupied by priests for the next twenty years.

In 1945 the house and its four immediate neighbours were requisitioned for use as a 'halfway' hostel for more than a decade.  After modernisation, residents included the judge Sir Ronald Waterhouse - at that time a junior prosecuting counsel at the trial of the Moors murderers - and a member of the Hambro banking family.

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This house forms part of a terrace built in the early 1880s in the red brick Queen Anne style.  Until the outbreak of the First World War, the street was at the heart of a thriving avant-garde community of artists, writers and bohemians in Chelsea.  Here lived and worked artists such as the flamboyant James McNeill Whistler, Augustus John and John Singer Sargent.  A few doors away at Oscar Wilde's house, the greatest artistic and literary figures of the day were entertained in the buttercup-yellow drawing room with its ceiling painted by Whistler and Edwin Godwin.  It was there, in June 1894, that the Marquess of Queensberry called on Wilde, unannounced, and threatened to 'thrash' him.

Residents of this house in the 1950s included Czech designer Miroslav Smutny, and Bohuslav Brouk, a biologist, philosopher and writer.  Later the mountaineer Eric Shipton lived in the basement flat. 

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The first residents of this house, in 1888, were Captain the Hon. Frederick Howard and his wife Constance, an author.  About five years after moving in, Lady Constance started divorce proceedings.  Her husband's response was to shoot himself in the smoking room, and his young mistress followed suit a day later.  The press quickly connected the two suicides and the events became a minor scandal.  Other residents included General Renny 'Saviour of the Punjab', and Henry Vernet, chairman of Bensons merchant bank.

The house was requisitioned by the Council for twenty years after the Second World War, before becoming a Girls' Friendly Society hostel until the mid-1990s.

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This house built in c.1849 has come to be identified as the home of fictional spy James Bond.  His 'treasured Scottish housekeeper' May McGrath had her quarters in the basement, and Bond's bedroom was furnished with a king-sized bed from Harrods - 'if you like women, cheap bedding is a false economy'.

From 1935 it was the home of cricketer George Kemp-Welch and his wife Diana, daughter of the Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin.  Kemp-Welch died aged thirty-six in the V1 bombing of the Guards Chapel in 1944.  A later resident was the writer Robert Lacey. 

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A house built in 1889, which from 1915 was the home of General Sir Herbert Plumer.  With his squat figure, ruddy countenance and white moustache, General Plumer cut an apparently comical figure which belied the reality that he was one of the most effective and successful of First World War generals.  He later became Governor and Commander-in-Chief of Malta.

A diplomat, Charles Howard-Smith, moved in in the 1920s.  After his appointment as British Minister to Denmark in October 1939, he and his family were captured by the Germans when Copenhagen was occupied, but were soon released and reached England in a sealed train via Holland and Belgium.

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This early Georgian street remains almost as originally built three hundred years ago.  The first resident of the house was the widow of a wealthy City merchant, whose neighbours included MPs, a director of the Bank of England and a judge.  Owing to its proximity to Lincoln's Inn, the street soon became popular with lawyers, which was the case with this house for more than 150 years.  From 1998 it housed the Sybil Campbell Library.

Others in the street included novelist and poet George Meredith, decadent poet Algernon Swinburne, writer and publisher E.V. Lucas, Dorothy L. Sayers and Leonard Woolf. 

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The actress Mary Ure moved to this mews house in 1957 after her marriage to John Osborne.  The recent success of his play Look Back in Anger had turned Osborne from a struggling playwright into a wealthy and famous 'angry young man'.  In January 1961 a fire at the house might have proved fatal, were it not for their dachshund Snoopy, who jumped on the bed and licked their noses to alert them.

A later resident was businessman Sir Michael Edwardes.

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Some fifty years after it was built in 1850, this house was tenanted by the artist Charles Conder and his new wife Stella.  Their wide circle of friends was entertained frequently at the house, including the Australian artist Arthur Streeton, Albert Rothenstein, Augustus John, William Orpen and the society hostess Lady Ottoline Morell.  A subsequent resident in 1911 - another artist - invited her husband's mistress to call: the reception she got was to be tarred and feathered from head to foot.

The costume and scene designer Audrey Cruddas moved here during the Second World War.

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This late Georgian cul-de-sac was laid out in 1772 on land belonging to the City of London Corporation, called the Lord Mayor's Banqueting Ground.  Early tenants of this house were the 3rd Earl of Portmore; and Sir John St. Aubyn, a wealthy dilettante, who lived here with his large collection of minerals, fossils and paintings - and numerous illegitimate children.  In the 19th century residents included Dr. Frederic Quin, the first homeopathic physician in England, and the architect Joseph Clarke.

In the 1920s part of the house became a business address.  The whole property was leased in 1977 to the recording company Chrysalis, which was already at the house next door, and the two properties were combined to accommodate the AIR (Associated Independent Recording) Group as well.  A two-storey rear extension was built so that there would be room for the producer George Martin's grand piano.

 

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