Built in 1859 on the site of a Georgian mansion called Sheffield House, this house was first occupied by the builder's father-in-law, a prosperous copper-plate printer.  It was later the home of church architect William Kedo Broder, who died falling between the carriage and platform at Westbourne Park station when trying to board a train.  A dashing RAF officer, Mungo Buxton, lived here in the 1950s.  He designed various single-seat sailplanes and was largely responsible for the first British troop-carrying glider.

A near neighbour was Admiral Nicholas Wolkoff, one-time ADC to Tsar Nicholas and the last Imperial Russian naval attache.  He opened the Russian Tea Room in South Kensington, a place frequented by White Russians and where members of the secret society, the Right Club, used to meet.

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This house was built in 1776 in a street which now forms the core of Marylebone's private medical quarter.  One of the early residents was Admiral the Hon Thomas Pakenham.  Another, who had retired from the East India Company, in 1813 spent nearly as much on decorating the house as he did buying it - the list of expenditure survives.  A few doors away was the home and virtual prison of poet Elizabeth Barrett who eloped with Robert Browning in 1846.

But from the early days the street was the home of medical men, including Sir Frederick Treves, friend of the 'Elephant Man'; and Arthur Conan Doyle in his days as an ophthalmic practitioner.  When this house was the home and practice of Dr. Richard Asher, Paul McCartney moved into a top floor room for three years.  Several of the Beatles' songs were written in the basement music room, including I Want to Hold Your Hand, Eleanor Rigby and Yesterday.

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Part of a glorious terrace of Italianate villas by Henry Bassett, this house was built c.1842 and home to several merchants and a small school in the mid-19th century.  Poor Mrs. Charles Dickens spent the last twenty years of her life opposite after separating from her husband - when she left, never to see her husband again, she was allowed to take with her only their eldest child.

In the 20th century neighbours included Walter Sickert, a prominent member of the Camden Town group of painters, who also took a keen interest in the Jack the Ripper case.  From the early 1960s the crescent became a celebrated nerve-centre for liberal intellectuals, artists, writers and journalists. These included Jonathan Miller, Alan Bennett (and 'the lady in the van'), Claire Tomalin, Ursula Vaughan Williams and jazz musician George Melly.

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Designed by John Nash as part of his plan to develop the Crown lands into the fashionable residential estate of Regent's Park - this house was built c.1825.  A prosperous stone merchant and paving contractor, John Mowlem, was the first tenant whose company was to become one of the largest in the country.  Other residents included a lady who experienced a strange psychic occurrence at the house in 1856; Sir Guildhaume Myrddin-Evans, chief international labour advisor to the Government; and French horn virtuoso Barry Tuckwell.

Mendelssohn, Dickens, Darwin and Gerald du Maurier all spent periods in neighbouring houses, as well as 'Mrs Aria' - gossip columnist and long-term lover of actor Henry Irving. 

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Built in the early 1840s on the site of nursery gardens, this house is part of a square designed by George Basevi.  The area became highly fashionable after the surplus funds from the 1851 Great Exhibition helped to create the new 'South Kensington' devoted to the promotion of the arts and sciences.

Early tenants of the house included a Major-General and an Admiral, and another in 1868 whose caretaker - a music hall actress - comprehensively stripped the house when it was left in her care. She was arrested wearing one of her mistress's best silk dresses.  During the 1960s the house was owned by the diplomat Sir Peter Wakefield and later by Prince and Princess Yuri Galitzine.  Wild parties were thrown in a neighbouring house by the flamboyant theatre critic Kenneth Tynan, whose guests regularly included John Lennon, Germaine Greer, Vanessa Redgrave and Roman Polanski.  One evening Princess Margaret and Lord Snowdon watched risque movies there with Harold Pinter and Peter Cook.

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This square was laid out from 1811 by a successful chimney sweep turned developer and was soon occupied by fashionable and wealthy people.  An early tenant of the house was Admiral George Stewart, Earl of Galloway, before it was acquired by the recently widowed Viscountess Dudley and Ward in the 1820s.  The enormous wealth of the Ward family derived from vast coal reserves on their land in Staffordshire as well as sugar plantations in Jamaica.  Later residents of the house included a director of the East India Company, a Baron of the Exchequer, an MP, Walter Agnew of the famous Bond Street art dealers, and the third Baron Greville.

Notable neighbours included the Duke of Brunswick, and Earls Lathom, Waldegrave, Shaftesbury and Shrewsbury.  Another was the pianoforte maker John Broadwood - at whose house Chopin gave a recital in 1837.  In the 1920s Somerset Maugham and his interior decorator wife Syrie threw glamorous parties - guests often included Arnold Bennett, H.G. Wells, Virginia Woolf, Ivor Novello, Noel Coward and D.H. Lawrence who mingled with the eccentric Lord Berners, the Sitwells and the Guinnesses.

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Dating from 1858, this house represents the last hurrah in the building of big private villas around the common before the arrival of today's grids of Victorian and later development.  Members of the Clapham Sect of wealthy evangelicals lived nearby, including William Wilberforce whose house was just behind.

Residents included a banker, a tobacco manufacturer, a theatre proprietor and biscuit manufacturer John Carr, who introduced such now-familiar names as the garibaldi, bourbon and custard cream.  In 1870 his company sent 220 million biscuits to feed the besieged of Paris in a deal brokered by the Rothschild family.  During the early 20th century the house became a private hospital.  Then in the mid-1960s the Royal Antediluvian Order of Buffaloes moved in - the club's bar was allegedly visited by local resident Vivienne Westwood.

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This was one of a row of houses built in c.1738 and called Elysium Row for its far-reaching views over nursery gardens.  The house was a country retreat for a deputy-auditor of the Exchequer in the 18th century.  In the 1850s it was a girls' school run by Baron de Wiercinski, a Polish patriot who had been imprisoned by the Austrians in the dungeon of Spilberg after the revolution of 1830.  The actor Frederick Sullivan later lived here, and his brother Arthur composed The Lost Chord while staying with him during his last illness in 1877.

From the 1920s the house was owned by the sculptor Peter Induni.  The stables and coach house were used as a studio by him and later by Hermon Cawthra, who carved the figure of Britannia which looks down on Piccadilly Circus.

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This house was built in 1905 for Walter Runciman MP on the footprint of an early Georgian property. An extraordinary mixture of people has lived here, including Count Zinzendorf, a bishop of the Moravian church; a porter; a house painter; and the 9th Duke of Marlborough.  For a few years during the 18th century it was a boarding house for Westminster School boys.  In the 1860s Lord Arthur Pelham-Clinton lodged at the house - he was heavily implicated in the notorious scandal involving transvestites Frederick Park and Ernest Boulton, aka 'Fanny and Stella'.

The street similarly fluctuated socially with a female refuge next door from the 1850s housing prostitutes willing to reform.  In 1903 most of the original properties were demolished to make way for smart new townhouses, offices and government buildings.

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A house built c.1826 and home for many years to a wax chandler before it became a lodging house. Later residents included a wealthy tailor in the 1920s who fatally took poison mistaking it for mouthwash; and Sir John Arnold, a senior divorce and family judge.

In the 1890s Rosa Lewis ran a maison de convenience at a nearby house, where the Prince of Wales and his friends could take their mistresses.  Other neighbours were Lord Snowdon, who was born in the street; Whitehall mandarin and novelist C.P. Snow; the actor Christopher Lee; Sir John Rennie, head of MI6; and Sir Terence Conran.

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