A house built in 1851 on the site of the old Kensington workhouse.  The Great Exhibition that year made the area highly fashionable and this cul-de-sac was soon home to professional or independent people able to afford the high rents.  Distinguished artists, such as Richard Westmacott the Younger and Jasper Cropsey, also lived in the street and General Garibaldi breakfasted at a neighbouring house on his visit to London in 1864.  Later residents included civil engineer Sir Benjamin Baker who designed the Forth Bridge, and Admiral Sir Francis McClintock known for his discoveries in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago.

An early resident of this house was the Reverend Teignmouth-Shore, Chaplain-in-Ordinary to Queen Victoria and later to Edward VII and George V.  He was present at all the royal events and was held in such high regard by Queen Victoria's daughter, the Empress of Germany, that her son the Kaiser telegraphed Teignmouth-Shore to be present at her deathbed in 1901.  The actress Ambrosine Phillpotts, whose films included Room at the Top and Expresso Bongo, moved here after the Second World War.

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'Kensington New Town', built on old nursery ground from 1839, was home to many distinguished artists.  The engraver and watercolourist Joseph Lionel Williams, and subsequently his widow, lived in this house for nearly fifty years.  Across the road at Eldon Lodge lived Edward Henry Corbould, historical painter and Instructor of Drawing and Painting to Queen Victoria's children.  Numerous other artists in the street included animal painter Richard Ansdell, portrait painter Samuel Sidley, Richard Caton Woodville and John Hanson Walker - a protege of Lord Leighton.

This hive of artistic activity continued well into the twentieth century.  Other interesting residents of the street have included David Lloyd George, Sir Hugh Casson and Dustin Hoffman - and at this house Lord Hambro.

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The great spurt of building on the Ladbroke estate in the early 1850s far outstripped demand, bankrupting many of the developers in the process.  In parts of the estate carcases of unfinished houses with crumbling decorations stood unoccupied for years - in fact the neighbouring street to this house was known as 'Coffin Row'.

The grand architecture of this crescent represents the full-on confident splendour of the Victorian age.  Its position was advertised as 'one of the most healthy and desirable' in West London - however noxious gases from the new sewers probably caused the death of the three-year-old son of the first resident of this house.  A prosperous military tailor lived here for many years, later acquiring the freehold of the house next door as well.  The two houses were partly combined to create an imposing double frontage.

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A house built c.1846 and home to an array of distinguished residents.  One of these was the third Baron Aberdare - an army officer, and champion amateur tennis player and cricketer.  During the 1930s and 40s he served on the International Olympic Committee and was a key player in the decision to send British athletes to Hitler's 1936 Olympics.  Commander Allon Bacon moved here in 1949.  During the war he had been a naval intelligence officer at Bletchley Park, where he held various posts, including liaison with the Admiralty.  He was also involved in daring commando raids on German submarines, during one capturing an Enigma and vital documents - George VI called this 'perhaps the most important single event in the whole war at sea'.

Other residents of the street have included numerous artists, the poet Henry Newbolt, a Russian princess, David Lloyd George, Sir Hugh Casson and Dustin Hoffman.

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The area known as Fulham Fields was mostly in the occupation of market gardeners and nurserymen until the last quarter of the 19th century, growing corn, vegetables and fruit for the Covent Garden market.  The stimulus for development came from the Metropolitan District Railway and this house was built in 1886-7.  An eminent architect, Francis Fowler, was an early resident who had worked with his father on the design of many of the theatres in Shaftesbury Avenue.  A later occupant of the house was Surveyor General of Ceylon.  Across the road the vicar started a church cricket and football club in 1879 which was later to become the nucleus of Fulham Football Club.  Other residents in the street included the actress and prolific author Florence Marryat, particularly known for her sensational novels and her involvement with several celebrated spiritual mediums.  Formula 1 champion James Hunt lived nearby in the early 1980s.

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This house was first built in 1850 on the site of market gardens.  An early resident was Ernest Jones, one of the most prominent figures of the Chartist movement, who knew both Marx and Engels personally.  In 1886 the house and its neighbour were combined and rebuilt as a coach-house and stables for the brand new Kensington Court development directly behind.  The building had space for two carriages, stabling for eight horses and living quarters for a coachman and grooms. Sophisticated features included a lift for the carriages.  For many years it housed the carriages, then the cars, of Louis Montagu 2nd Baron Swaythling.  After 1929 the house was converted back to private residential use.  Other residents in the street included J.T. Grein, the influential impresario and drama critic, and film producers Lord Birkett and Robert Erskine.  Psychotherapist Stephen Sebag-Montefiore ran his practice from his basement nearby - inspiring a 1965 television sketch by Peter Cook and Dudley Moore, both of whom he treated.

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Nelson thought this terrace built in the 1770s 'one of the finest rows of houses in the environs of the Metropolis'.  The relatively isolated position made highwaymen and footpads a hazard - nonetheless prosperous City merchants and bankers soon moved in, attracted by the high and healthy land and far-reaching views.  A wealthy wine merchant was the first resident of this house in 1775.  Others in the terrace later included politician Joseph Chamberlain and author Wilkie Collins who attended a boarding school in one of the neighbouring houses - he attributed his talent for storytelling to the bullying he experienced there.  At the start of the 20th century the house became the offices of the Great Northern & City Railway Co., the only tube to have had first-class seating.  From the 1920s for 75 years it was an Italian restaurant - later a cafe - at one time frequented by Walter Sickert who ran a school of painting two doors down.  The basement of a nearby house in the terrace was used as a recording studio by musician Curly Clayton where he recorded the first session with the Rolling Stones in 1962.

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Belgravia was one of London's most fashionable residential districts from the start and until the Second World War remained a securely upper class address.  This house was built c.1844 by Thomas Cubitt and has been home to a son of Lord Penrhyn and a wealthy racehorse owner and breeder.  From 1936 it was owned by the 2nd Lord Pender of Cable and Wireless.  During the war the company, working with the Post Office, introduced Expeditionary Force Messages which became the key communication for soldiers sending messages home and vice versa - these messages sometimes totalling 20,000 a day.  

Other residents of the street have included aviation pioneer John Moore-Brabazon and the Marquis of Queensberry, remembered for the 'Marquis of Queensberry' rules that formed the basis of modern boxing and for his role in the downfall of Oscar Wilde.

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A house built c.1828 and part of Harrow School's development of its land in the area.  The seclusion given by such spacious houses, in easy carriage distance of the West End, quickly gave St. John's Wood a slightly risque reputation with mistresses and courtesans living here.  But seclusion was also a requirement for writers and artists, many of whom began settling in this street and nearby.  These included Sir Edwin Landseer who lived in a large house nearby, his brother Thomas who lived in the street, and Alfred and Lionel Constable who were directly next door.

Emily Davies lived in this house for twenty-five years.  She was a feminist and pioneering campaigner for women's education - her crowning achievement being the foundation of Girton College Cambridge.

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Forest Hill became a fashionable suburb in the 19th century - the catalysts for its prosperity being the removal of the Crystal Palace to Sydenham and the arrival of the railway.  The geography of the area, with its picturesque hills and valleys and fine views also encouraged wealthy people, such as tea merchants Frederick Horniman and the Tetley brothers to live here.  This house was built c.1883 and has been home to a variety of residents, including a Spanish cork manufacturer and John Illsley of Dire Straits.  From the 1930s for more than sixty years Ling's confectionery factory abutting on to the garden behind perfumed the air with Turkish Delight.

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