The actress Mary Ure moved to this mews house in 1957 after her marriage to John Osborne.  The recent success of his play Look Back in Anger had turned Osborne from a struggling playwright into a wealthy and famous 'angry young man'.  In January 1961 a fire at the house might have proved fatal, were it not for their dachshund Snoopy, who jumped on the bed and licked their noses to alert them.

A later resident was businessman Sir Michael Edwardes.

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Some fifty years after it was built in 1850, this house was tenanted by the artist Charles Conder and his new wife Stella.  Their wide circle of friends was entertained frequently at the house, including the Australian artist Arthur Streeton, Albert Rothenstein, Augustus John, William Orpen and the society hostess Lady Ottoline Morell.  A subsequent resident in 1911 - another artist - invited her husband's mistress to call: the reception she got was to be tarred and feathered from head to foot.

The costume and scene designer Audrey Cruddas moved here during the Second World War.

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This late Georgian cul-de-sac was laid out in 1772 on land belonging to the City of London Corporation, called the Lord Mayor's Banqueting Ground.  Early tenants of this house were the 3rd Earl of Portmore; and Sir John St. Aubyn, a wealthy dilettante, who lived here with his large collection of minerals, fossils and paintings - and numerous illegitimate children.  In the 19th century residents included Dr. Frederic Quin, the first homeopathic physician in England, and the architect Joseph Clarke.

In the 1920s part of the house became a business address.  The whole property was leased in 1977 to the recording company Chrysalis, which was already at the house next door, and the two properties were combined to accommodate the AIR (Associated Independent Recording) Group as well.  A two-storey rear extension was built so that there would be room for the producer George Martin's grand piano.

 

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This house built in c.1862 on the Gunter estate in Brompton, was first occupied by the widow of Colonel Sir Joshua Jebb, a military engineer and the designer of several prisons, including Pentonville and Broadmoor.

Later residents included the Jennings family, members of whom lived at the house for forty-two years from 1911.  Gertrude Jennings was a dramatic author, who enjoyed great success in the first quarter of the 20th century with plays such as No Servants and The New Poor.  Her brother Richard was literary editor and leader writer of the Daily Mirror.  He was a well-known bibliophile, filling the house with books, and his many friends in literary and intellectual circles.  These included Virginia Woolf and others in the Bloomsbury Group, Clifford Kitchin, T. S. Eliot, Edith Sitwell and the society hostess Lady Ottoline Morrell.

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A terrace laid out between 1844 to 1846 to a design by George Basevi.  One of the first residents was the future politician Sir James Stansfeld, who was then London agent for Giuseppe Mazzini, spearhead of the Italian revolutionary movement.  Mazzini spent several months of 1851 staying at the house.  Other occupants included Thomas Vacher, the parliamentary publisher; and Edward Trelawny, the writer, adventurer and companion of Byron and Shelley, who lived here with his young mistress in 1860.

Actors Murray Carrington and Basil Rathbone had rooms here after the First World War, as did Virginia Greer Yardley, a modernist painter from Delaware.  After two decades as a guesthouse, the property was converted to flats, before being restored to a single dwelling in the 1980s.  A recent resident was Tamara Mellon.

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This semi-detached villa, built in 1845 on the Ladbroke estate, features a Lombardic tower, an early example of this genre which did not generally become fashionable until the 1850s.  A silk mercer and French ribbon importer was an early resident, followed by a solicitor in the High Court of Chancery.  His wife was the widow of Captain James Seton, the last English person to die in a duel on British soil - in 1845.

In the 20th century, rock guitarist Jimi Hendrix died of a drug overdose at an apartment across the road in the early hours of 18th September 1970.

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This mid-1840s terrace was designed by William Willmer Pocock on land owned by Baroness von Zandt.  Wealthy residents soon moved in, but their tenure was followed by a decade as a lodging house in the 1860s.  Later occupants of the house included Oliver Martin-Smith, a member of the Smith banking family; and writer and diplomat Simon Harcourt-Smith.  Film editor and director Reginald Mills lived here after the Second World War while he was working on The Red Shoes.  Other residents were the diplomat Sir Berkeley Gage and journalist Keith Briant. 

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A house built in c.1847 near the entrance to the old Hippodrome racecourse, which ran - rather unsuccessfully - for five years until 1841.  Malcolm Hulke, a writer for Doctor Who, had a flat here in the 1950s, as did Harish Chandra Sarin, an Indian civil servant and writer.  He later became Defence Secretary and Ambassador of India to Nepal, whilst also playing a significant role in the development of mountaineering in India.  The house later belonged to actress Joan Luxton, who in the 1920s founded The Children's Theatre in Endell Street.  Its shows were aimed at young performers, such as Phyllis Calvert, who later became stars.  Joan Luxton ran her fancy dress costume hire business from the house until her death in 1985.

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This pair of houses in the heart of old Chelsea date from around 1690 and were at first occupied as a single dwelling, with neighbours such as the Duchess of Monmouth and Tobias Smollett.  But from the 1830s the house was sub-let to several households, culminating in its being combined with the property adjoining as a sixpence-a-night doss-house.  The number of lodgers frequently totalled 100 living in squalid conditions scarcely better than those at the workhouse.  Doss-houses often provided a three-relay system in which lodgers shared a bed in three eight-hour shifts.

Residents in the 1920s included an intrepid young actress who set off alone to British Guiana where she spent six months in the jungle living among the Mazaruni Indians digging for diamonds.  Later occupants of the house were the journalist and novelist Philip Jordan and Lady Galway.

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Built mainly in the 1840s on the site of nursery gardens, this street became highly fashionable after the surplus funds from the 1851 Great Exhibition helped to create the new 'South Kensington' devoted to the promotion of the arts and sciences.  Early tenants included an organist and composer of sacred music, a Canadian merchant and politician, and architect T. Marsh Nelson who designed the layouts of Westbourne and Gloucester Terraces in Bayswater.

After the Second World War the house was bought by art dealer Geoffrey Houghton Brown who shared it for a year with flamboyant decorator Ronald Fleming and architectural historian James Lees-Milne.  In the late 1940s it became home to author Joyce Maxtone Graham who under her pen name Jan Struther created the enormously popular 'Mrs. Miniver'.  Neighbours in the 1990s included Anthony Hopkins.

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